Services


Bridges
Bridges are natural-looking dental appliances that can replace a section of missing teeth. Because they are custom-made, bridges are barely noticeable and can restore the natural contour of teeth as well as the proper bite relationship between upper and lower teeth.
Bridges are sometimes referred to as fixed partial dentures, because they are semi-permanent and are bonded to existing teeth or implants. Some bridges are removable and can be cleaned by the wearer; others need to be removed by a dentist.
Porcelain, gold alloys or combinations of materials are usually used to make bridge appliances.
Appliances called implant bridges are attached to an area below the gum tissue, or the bone.

                                                     

Crowns
Crowns are synthetic caps, usually made of a material like porcelain, placed on the top of a tooth.
Crowns are typically used to restore a tooth's function and appearance following a restorative procedure such as a root canal. When decay in a tooth has become so advanced that large portions of the tooth must be removed, crowns are often used to restore the tooth.
Crowns are also used to attach bridges, cover implants, prevent a cracked tooth from becoming worse, or an existing filling is in jeopardy of becoming loose or dislocated. Crowns also serve an aesthetic use, and are applied when a discolored or stained tooth needs to be restored to its natural appearance.
A tooth must usually be reduced in size to accommodate a crown. An impression is made of the existing tooth and an impression is made. The impression is sent to a special lab, which manufactures a custom-designed crown. In some cases, a temporary crown is applied until the permanent crown is ready. Permanent crowns are cemented in place.
Crowns are sometimes confused with veneers, but they are quite different. Veneers are typically applied only to relatively small areas.
                                                     

Caring For Your Crowns
With proper care, a good quality crown could last up to eight years or longer. It is very important to floss in the area of the crown to avoid excess plaque or collection of debris around the restoration.
Certain behaviors such as jaw clenching or bruxism (teeth grinding) significantly shorten the life of a crown. Moreover, eating brittle foods, ice or hard candy can compromise the adhesion of the crown, or even damage the crown.
Root Canal Therapy
Root canals are tiny passageways that branch off from beneath the top of the tooth, coursing their way vertically downward, until they reach the tip of the root.
All teeth have between one and four root canals.
Many tooth problems involve infections that spread to the pulp, which is the inner chamber of the tooth containing blood vessels, nerves and other tissues. When the infection becomes worse, it can begin affecting the roots. A traumatic injury to a tooth can also compromise the pulp, leading to similar problems.
A diseased inner tooth brings a host of problems; pain and sensitivity are some of the first indications of a problem; but inside, a spreading infection can cause small pockets of pus to develop, leading to an abscess.
Root canal therapy is a remarkable treatment with a very high rate of success, and involves removing the diseased tissue, halting the spread of infection and restoring the healthy portion of the tooth. In fact, root canal therapy is designed to save a problem tooth; before the procedure was developed and gained acceptance, the only alternative for treating a diseased tooth was extraction.
Root canal therapy usually entails one to three visits. During the first visit, a small hole is drilled through the top of the tooth and into the inner chamber. Diseased tissue is removed, the inner chamber cleansed and disinfected, and the tiny canals reshaped. The cleansed chamber and canals are filled with an elastic material and medication designed to prevent infection. If necessary, the drilled hole is temporarily filled until a permanent seal is made with a crown.
Most patients who have root canal experience little or no discomfort or pain, and enjoy a restored tooth that can last almost as long as its healthy original.
                                                      

Partial Dentures
Partial dentures, also known as removable dentures, fill in gaps in the smile caused by missing teeth. Partial dentures are custom designed to the contours of a patient's bite. Generally made from a combination of resin and metal, partial dentures are attached by discreet metal clasps or tooth-colored, precision attachments. Partial dentures restore a patient's ability to chew comfortably, protect surrounding teeth from shifting or damage, and help maintain normal facial contours in the lips and cheeks. To find out if partial dentures might be a good solution for you, please contact City Dental Group.
                                                       

Full Dentures
For individuals who have lost all of their teeth, our practice offers both dental implants and full dentures as options. Full dentures are a custom-molded dental appliance that fits snugly against gums. These replacement teeth can be attached through a variety of means, including adhesives, attachment to existing tooth roots, and dental implants. They allow patients to resume normal chewing and speaking, and they restore natural contours to the jaw and face. If you have lost all or most of your teeth and would like to explore your dental options, we can help. Contact City Dental Group.
                                                        

Night Guards/Bite Appliances
Excessive clenching, grinding, or poor bite alignment can strain your jaw joints or injure your teeth, causing discomfort and often, severe pain. Dizziness, ear pain, head and neck pain, chewing difficulties, muscle soreness, and even throat pain may surface as the condition worsens. To correct such problems, we offer a variety of fixed and removable bite appliances, including nightguards. When worn, nightguards prevent teeth from touching one another, ultimately relaxing the jaw muscles and alleviating pain. To learn more about bite appliances, please contact our practice today.
                                                        

Extractions
In only the most extreme and necessary cases-such as when its roots are severely damaged beyond repair-we may extract a tooth in preparation for a restorative dentistry procedure, such as dentures. If you have any questions about tooth extraction, please contact us today.
                                                        

Bad Breath Treatment
Bad breath, also called halitosis, is more than just embarrassing. It may be the symptom of an underlying health problem. In addition to pungent foods, bad breath is frequently caused by dry mouth condition, poor oral hygiene, or periodontal disease. There is no need to suffer with chronic bad breath. We offer effective treatments, such as anti-microbial mouthwash and specialized soft tissue treatments, to combat bad breath and the conditions that cause it. Let us help you find the cause of your halitosis and develop an effective treatment plan. Contact City Dental Group.
Toothaches   
Simple toothaches can often be relieved by rinsing the mouth to clear it of debris and other matter. Sometimes, a toothache can be caused or aggravated by a piece of debris lodged between the tooth and another tooth. Avoid placing an aspirin between your tooth and gum to relieve pain, because the dissolving aspirin can actually harm your gum tissue.
Broken, Fractured, or Displaced Tooth
A broken, fractured or displaced tooth is usually not a cause for alarm, as long as decisive, quick action is taken.
If the tooth has been knocked out, try to place the tooth back in its socket while waiting to see your dentist.
First, rinse the mouth of any blood or other debris and place a cold cloth or compress on the check near the injury. This will keep down swelling.
If you cannot locate the tooth back in its socket, hold the dislocated tooth by the crown - not the root. Next, place it in a container of warm milk, saline or the victim's own saliva and keep it in the solution until you arrive at the emergency room or dentist's office.
For a fractured tooth, it is best to rinse with warm water and again, apply a cold pack or compress. Ibuprofen may be used to help keep down swelling.
If the tooth fracture is minor, the tooth can be sanded or if necessary, restored by the dentist if the pulp is not severely damaged.
If a child's primary tooth has been loosened by an injury or an emerging permanent tooth, try getting the child to gently bite down on an apple or piece of caramel; in some cases, the tooth will easily separate from the gum.